Which is correct and why?

1. I enclose a copy of the annual report herewith for your reference.
2. I am enclosing a copy of the annual report herewith for your reference.
3. I have enclosed a copy of the annual report herewith for your reference.

4. Please find attached a proforma invoice for your reference.
5. Please find attached the proforma invoice for your reference.
6. Please find attached proforma invoice for your reference.

7. Please find attached.....for your forward to the director.
8. Please find attached.....for your forwarding to the director.
Original Post
Let's discuss 1, 2, and 3 first.
  • In a business letter, using the simple present (I enclose) gives a more formal air to the letter than no. 2, which uses the present progressive (I'm enclosing) and sounds a bit more conversational in tone.
  • No. 3 uses the present perfect (I have enclosed), which shows that this is something the writer did only a moment before. It's just another aspect of time.

    Now let's discuss 4, 5, and 6.
  • The only difference between 4 and 5 is that in 4 the writer is talking about a form that has not been previously mentioned between him and the person who's going to receive this letter.
  • In 5 we know, because the writer uses the definite article, that the person receiving the letter is aware of this form and expecting it.
  • No. 6 is ungrammatical. Proforma invoice is a countable noun and must have an article before it, either a or the.

    Finally, let's discuss 7 and 8. Neither one of these sentences is grammatical.
  • Forward is a base form verb, not a noun, so you can't use the possessive adjective your with it.
  • No. 8 does not sound natural. This is how it can be corrected: Please find attached ... for you to forward to the director.
  • Thank you very much, Richard.

    How about "Please find attached...for your use" and "Please find attached...for your action"? Are they correct?
    The first one (for your use) is fine. I'm not sure about for your action without any context, but at least it's grammatical, Alex.
    Hello, Richard.

    You said that the present perfect in No.3 above was another aspect of time, did you mean it was not correct to start off a letter or email by saying that? Neither formal nor informal?

    Many thanks,
    Alex
    Let's look at that again:

    quote:
    No. 3 uses the present perfect (I have enclosed), which shows that this is something the writer did only a moment before. It's just another aspect of time.

    There's nothing I said here that should lead you to think using the present perfect is incorrect. If it had been wrong, I would have said so, my friend.

    When I said it just shows another aspect of time, that's exactly what the present perfect does. In this use, it shows that something happened very recently or even just a few moments ago. Its use can be important so that the listener or reader doesn't think the action happened a long time ago in the past.

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