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@alexandra posted:

I worried that "my friend Alice's car " may be misunderstood that my friend is Alice's car. So the apposition of friend can either be Alice or Alice's car, it depends on the context, right?

Hi, Alexandra—No, the phrase would not be misunderstood that way. Not only would that reading be silly, but I believe it is also syntactically impossible: if someone interpreted the phrase that way, their interpretation would be invalid. If you want your friend to be Alice's car, you can say "Alice's car, my friend."

 

Last edited by David, Moderator

Hi, Alexandra—No, the phrase would not be misunderstood that way. Not only would that reading be silly, but I believe it is also syntactically impossible: if someone interpreted the phrase that way, their interpretation would be invalid. If you want your friend to be Alice's car, you can say "Alice's car, my friend."

 

Thank you very much,David! You perfectly answered my question!:)

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