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"include" only means "contain" something or someone as a part, while "comprise," "consist of," and "composed of," may be used for all the parts something is made up of. e.g. The house comprises two bedrooms, a kitchen, and a living room./The committee is comprised of well-known mountaineers./Lunch consisted of sandwiches and fruit./Muscle is composed of two different types of protein.


@f6pafd posted:

"include" only means "contain" something or someone as a part, while "comprise," "consist of," and "composed of," may be used for all the parts something is made up of. e.g. The house comprises two bedrooms, a kitchen, and a living room./The committee is comprised of well-known mountaineers./Lunch consisted of sandwiches and fruit./Muscle is composed of two different types of protein.

Hello, @f6pafd, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

I think you've given Andrew a good answer. The non-exhaustive nature of "include" actually leads most legal English writers (an area where inclusion and exclusion are concepts of utmost importance) to resort to this verb phrase and other related variants: "... includes, but is not limited to, ..."

Hello, @f6pafd, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

I think you've given Andrew a good answer. The non-exhaustive nature of "include" actually leads most legal English writers (an area where inclusion and exclusion are concepts of utmost importance) to resort to this verb phrase and other related variants: "... includes, but is not limited to, ..."

Thank you for your approval, Moderator.   Being a new member, hope I can be helpful.

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