Hello. I sometimes see structures like this

> He *has you sad*. 

> He dreamed he *had his pants down* in front of everyone

I would like to know:

1. Are these sentences the passive causative or active ones?

2. What is the meaning they're conveing?

Original Post

Hi, Harry O'Neil,

Harry O'Neil posted:

1. Are these sentences the passive causative or active ones?

The passive causative is formed by "have" + object + past participle:

- He had his pants taken down (= lengthened). (Somebody took them down for him.)

The active causative is formed by "have" + object + bare infinitive:

- He had a tailor take down (= lengthen) his pants. (A tailor took them down for him.)

Harry O'Neil posted:

> He *has you sad*. 

> He dreamed he *had his pants down* in front of everyone

[...]

2. What is the meaning they're conveying?

I don't think "have" has a causative meaning in the sentences above, if we understand that "causative" means making somebody do something for you, or getting somebody to do something for you ("make" and "get" are action verbs).

Instead, I understand "have" in the sentences above as a stative verb:

- He has you sad = You are sad because of him.

- He had his pants down in front of everyone = His pants were down in front of everyone.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

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