'Clap for her' or 'clap her'

Yale Wale,

Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary gives several definitions for "clap" as a transitive verb, one of which is "applaud".  I have never heard it used this way, so I can't recommend it.  Use (2).

In my experience, "clap her", with no modification, means "strike her".

DocV

Doc V posted:

Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary gives several definitions for "clap" as a transitive verb, one of which is "applaud".  I have never heard it used this way, so I can't recommend it. 

I've never heard "clap" used that way, either. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) gives a similar definition. Interestingly, it uses the term "elliptically" after "transitive":

5c. transitive (elliptically) To clap the hands at, or in honour of, applaud (a person, performance, etc.) with claps. (Rarely, to drive away, out, etc. by clapping the hands.)

a1575   N. Harpsfield Treat. Divorce Henry VIII (1878) (modernized text) 121   The which John Bacon was whistled and clapped out of Rome.
a1616   Shakespeare Julius Caesar (1623) i. ii. 258   If the tag-ragge people did not clap him, and hisse him, according as he pleas'd, and displeas'd them.  
1669   S. Pepys Diary 2 Feb. (1976) IX. 436   Endeed, it was very finely sung, so as to make the whole house clap her.
1721   L. Eusden in J. Addison Wks. I. 264   Crowds the sentiments of every line Impartial clap'd.
1820   R. Southey Life of Wesley II. 488   A few bucks clapped and encored him.

Notice that the most recent example is from 1820. I think that most native speakers today, at least in the United States, would naturally assume that "clap her" must mean something other than "applaud." If I heard "The audience clapped her," my response might be: "I hope they didn't injure her."

Doc V posted:

Use (2).

I enthusiastically agree.

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