Hello, everyone,

Are these sentences correct?

1. My fingers aching, I kept on writing the draft, having little time left for submitting it.

2. My fingers aching, I kept on writing the draft, having little time left to submit it.

3. Having little time left for submitting it, I kept on writing the draft, my fingers aching.

4. Having little time left for its submission, I kept on writing the draft, my fingers aching.

5. Having little time left to submit it, I kept on writing the draft, my fingers aching.

6. I kept on writing the draft, having little time left for submitting it, my fingers aching.

Thanks.

Original Post

Hi, Ahmad,

In this case, I wouldn't refer to the sentences as being correct or incorrect, but as being good or bad.

(6) is, by far, the worst of all, because both participial clauses ("my fingers aching" an absolute one) are adjacent to each other. Such juxtaposition is not allowed.

All the others are acceptable, but personally I would prefer full clauses with a subordinating conjunction to express the intended meaning:

- Although my fingers hurt, I kept on writing the draft because I had little time left for submitting/to submit it. (much better than "for its submission")

As I had little time left for submitting/to submit the draft, I kept on writing it even though my fingers hurt/in spite of/despite my aching fingers.

Gustavo, Contributor posted:

(6) is, by far, the worst of all, because both participial clauses ("my fingers aching" an absolute one) are adjacent to each other. Such juxtaposition is not allowed.

- Although my fingers hurt, I kept on writing the draft because I had little time left for submitting/to submit it. (much better than "for its submission")

Hi, Gustavo,

Thanks a lot for the reply. However, I need a little more on 'such juxtaposition is not allowed', besides needing help to understand why '"for its submission"' is a less preferable option. Would you kindly help me?

Thanks.

PS: My Bearing/Bore post may also need some kind attention.

Having read your new post, realizing you need some more help, I'm going to give you an additional answer.

How do you find the two juxtaposed participial clauses above, Ahmad?

Don't you think this flows better?:

Having read your new post and realizing you need some more help, I'm going to give you an additional answer.

Juxtaposed participial clauses generally don't work, much less when their meanings are opposite, in which case "and" (or some other simple conjunction like "or") cannot join both clauseshaving little time left for submitting it (reason), my fingers aching (concession).

As for "for its submission," it sounds too formal to me, similar to the legal "for submission/submittal thereof," and I don't think that is in line with the spirit of your sentence.

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