Hi,

'For communication is always a matter of negotiating some kind of common agreement between the parties in an interaction."

If for means something like because, I think there is a missing complement. Thus the 'full stop' should have been a 'comma'.

'For communication is always a matter of negotiating some kind of common agreement between the parties in an interaction,..."

What do you think?
Original Post
It's there in the good dictionaries:

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for

2 : for this reason or on this ground : as indicated or shown by the following circumstance : in substantiation of which :witness the fact that -- used to introduce a reason for something before advanced (as a cause, motive, explanation, justification, or proof, of an action related or a statement made) <we believe that he will succeed, for he has talent> <the army should be reduced in numbers, for possession of large armies has led nations to war>

Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged.
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thus nothing new here.
quote:
'For communication is always a matter of negotiating some kind of common agreement between the parties in an interaction."

Ordinarily there would be a comma before 'for,' yes.

But, good writers and well-known writers are allowed some poetic and grammatical license. Perhaps Henry Widdowson, the author, was emphasizing the cause of what he describes. He means 'for this reason.'

It's possible to begin a sentence with a conjunction, especially 'and' and 'but.'

'For' is a formal 'because' or 'for this reason.'

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