(a) You, as a non-native English speaker, should learn English words, as many as you can if you want to be fluent in this language.

Are you OK with the above text? I am not. The following version works for me:

(b) You, as a non-native English speaker, should learn English words, as many as you can, if you want to be fluent in this language.


Here's my take:

1. Is it "as many as you can if you want to be fluent in this language"? This seems unlikely, because it is not true that this entire group modifies "words". Probably "if you want to be fluent in this language" modifies the verb, "learn".


2. Is it "as many as you can"? This is much more likely: it tells us something about the words, and it is parenthetic in that it is not quite necessary. So we'd better put it within parenthetic marks. So:


"You, as a non-native English speaker, should learn English words, as many as you can, if you want to be fluent in this language."

In addition to that, I know that a sentence can be rewritten in any way we like.

 

What do you think? (a) or (b)?

Original Post

Grammatically speaking, it is true that "if you want to be fluent in this language" refers to "should learn English words."

However, from a semantic point of view, if you take out the parenthetical "as many as you can" (which is correctly set off by commas and, being parenthetical, should allow for its elimination without a significant change of meaning), the sentence is too obvious to be good:

- You, as a non-native English speaker, should learn English words if you want to be fluent in this language.

"as many as you can" becomes thus essential for the sentence to be meaningful, and it is for this reason that I strongly suggest (c).

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