commas and periods

Hello,

Here is a part of self-introduction of an English proof reader born and educated in the UK.

  I like to encourage students as much as possible, I am here to help and I want to get the best   out of our customers. I want them to feel comfortable working with me and students must never get upset by my corrections, they are there to help, I never want to embarrass the student or make them feel they have lost confidence in carrying on learning the subject.

 I copied it from the website and pasted it here.

I’m wondering if the usage of quotations is correct.

After the word “corrections”, there is a comma, not a period, but it looks like the sentence ends there and a new sentence “they are there to help” begins. Shouldn’t there be a period, not a comma? I kind of think a new sentence should begin with a capital “They”.

The same thing can be said about the next sentence, “I never want to…” This is an independent sentence.

I’m not so good with quotations, but is this usage correct?

Apple

 https://lp.idiy.biz/?utm_sourc...RIBoJ0ClJMhQYGKuO1A-

Original Post
apple posted:

 ["]I like to encourage students as much as possible, I am here to help and I want to get the best   out of our customers. I want them to feel comfortable working with me and students must never get upset by my corrections, they are there to help, I never want to embarrass the student or make them feel they have lost confidence in carrying on learning the subject.["]
[. . .]
After the word “corrections”, there is a comma, not a period, but it looks like the sentence ends there and a new sentence “they are there to help” begins. Shouldn’t there be a period, not a comma? I kind of think a new sentence should begin with a capital “They”.

The same thing can be said about the next sentence, “I never want to…” This is an independent sentence.

I’m not so good with quotations, but is this usage correct?

Hi, Apple,

You're absolutely right. The sentence is a run-on sentence as it appears; there should be punctuation appropriate to marking the end of an independent clause following both "corrections" and "help." The commas are incorrect. Periods (full-stops) or semicolons could be used. Periods would be the most natural choice.

I don't think we can be certain, in this particular case, that the man associated with the text was responsible for the error. The various quotations are surrounded by what appear to me to be Japanese characters. It is possible, I think, that the website is translating a Japanese transcription of what he said.

Thank you always, David, for your prompt and pertinent reply, but I'm pretty sure that the proof readers  themselves write their self-introduction in English on the website. The incorrect use of quotations made me wonder about the quality of the proof readers.

Apple

 

 

apple posted:

The incorrect use of quotations made me wonder about the quality of the proof readers.

apple posted:
I’m wondering if the usage of quotations is correct.
apple posted:
I’m not so good with quotations, but is this usage correct?

Hello again, Apple,

I don't know what you mean by "use/usage of quotations," since your question is  about the use of commas and periods.

I'm guessing you mean that the use of a quotation containing poor punctuation or grammar is a poor use of the quotation.

In any case, I just want to assure you that the two sentences you've quoted are run-on sentences and are therefore incorrect.

Quote:

incorrect: I like to encourage students as much as possible, I am here to help and I want to get the best   out of our customers.

correct:I like to encourage students as much as possible. I am here to help and I want to get the best out of our customers.

incorrect:I want them to feel comfortable working with me and students must never get upset by my corrections, they are there to help, I never want to embarrass the student or make them feel they have lost confidence in carrying on learning the subject.

mostly correct: I want them to feel comfortable working with me. Students must never get upset by my corrections. They are there to help. I never want to embarrass the student or make them feel they have lost confidence in carrying on learning the subject.

The reason I labeled the last punctuation revision above "mostly correct" is that the last part -- "or make them feel they have lost confidence in carrying on learning the subject" -- is rather imprecise. Here is what is meant:

  • or cause them to lose confidence as learners
  • or make them feel less confident as learners

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