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Hi, Ahmed and Gustavo,

@Ahmed.A.A posted:

Hi,

"Sara is .......than Rose."

a- more quiet and polite   

b- quieter and politer   

I think both choices are correct, but I want to know if one is more common than the other.

Hi, Ahmed,

Two-syllable adjectives like "polite" do not usually take the comparative and superlative suffix. Then, it is much better and common to say "more quiet and polite." (b) sounds very weird.

I agree with Gustavo's answer that 'politer' is not so common as 'more polite', but, of course, both 'politer' and 'quieter' are grammatically correct (See Swan page: 137). Moreover, 'quieter' sounds much more common than 'more quiet'. On COCA:

- Quieter: (2628 hits) VS 'More quiet': (226 hits).

That's to say I see that both 'a' and 'b' are grammatically correct, particularly in an exam, but, in real life, as Gustavo has pointed out, you may find one pattern is more common than the other. Rachel has a comment on a similar question here:

https://thegrammarexchange.inf...uperlative-of-polite

@ahmed_btm posted:

Moreover, 'quieter' sounds much more common than 'more quiet'. On COCA:

- Quieter: (2628 hits) VS 'More quiet': (226 hits).

That's to say I see that both 'a' and 'b' are grammatically correct, particularly in an exam, but, in real life, as Gustavo has pointed out, you may find one pattern is more common than the other.

I agree, Ahmed. I think, however, that with two or more adjectives, mainly of different length, there is a tendency to use "more" as it will apply to the different adjectives inside the phrase. I haven't found any examples on COCA, but at Google Books "more quiet and polite" seems to be much more usual than "quieter and politer," which I find somewhat cacophonous, by the way. "More quiet and polite" seems to flow better.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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