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a. I depend on you to do the job.
b. I count on you to do the job.
c. I rely on you to do the job.

d. I need you to do the job.

In all cases, it is possible that the 'agent' of 'to do the job' is 'you'. I am hoping that you will do the job.
But is it possible that I expect and hope to do the job myself with your help? I think this possibility is more present in the case of d. But I am not sure it is non-existent in the first three cases.


Consider these sentences:

a1. I depend on your help to do the job.
b1. I count on your help to do the job.
c1. I rely on your help to do the job.

d1. I need your help to do the job.

They are fine, aren't they?
Can't the same logic work in the case of a, b, c  and d?

Many thanks


Original Post
@azz posted:

Consider these sentences:

a1. I depend on your help to do the job.
b1. I count on your help to do the job.
c1. I rely on your help to do the job.

d1. I need your help to do the job.

They are fine, aren't they?
Can't the same logic work in the case of a, b, c  and d?

Hi, Azz—Yes, it is possible for the same logic to work in cases (a) through (d). If, in spite of the help that a live context would provide, you want to ensure that there is no such ambiguity in (a) through (c), you could use -ing complements:

  • I depend on/count on/rely on your doing the job.

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