Hi, Ayman,

ayman posted:

Hi, teachers

I'd like to know whether this sentence in the attachment Ok or not.

I think it is a misrelated participle.

By the way, it is from our text book for secondary stage in Egypt.Screenshot_2019-09-13-23-09-11-1

 

Yes, I agree. It is a clear example of what is called "a dangling participle or dangling modifier". It is quite clear that the person who knocked on the door isn't the same person that was having lunch. Interestingly, in a former discussion with the editor of Longman, she said:

"Some people argue that sentences with danglers are acceptable because we can usually deduce the meaning, but such sentences are still technically ungrammatical."

ahmed_btm posted:
Interestingly, in a former discussion with the editor of Longman, she said:

"Some people argue that sentences with danglers are acceptable because we can usually deduce the meaning, but such sentences are still technically ungrammatical."

To clarify what the Longman editor meant, it is not that such sentences are ungrammatical. They are perfectly grammatical. But they are grammatical with respect to a meaning that the speaker did not intend.

Analogously, the sentence "He punched him" is perfectly grammatical, provided that the referent of "him" is different from the referent of "he." It is ungrammatical if "him" is to refer to the same person as "he":

He punched him.    He punched himself.

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