Did + base verb

Hi, Bear,

You can say:

1. "Peter parked his car ..."

2. "Peter did park his car ..."

NO. (2) is more emphatic.

The verb 'do' is used to give 'extra force' to the main verb. If you have a look at the 3rd definition of 'do' in LDOCE, you can read that 'do' is used to emphasize the main verb in a sentence, and it mentioned the following example:

You should have warned me.’ ‘But I did warn you.’

 

bearbear posted:

Is the following sentence should be "did + base verb" ? Why should we use "did" ?  Should I cross out the verb "did"?  Thanks

 

Peter did park his car near the gate of his house. 

Hi, bear,

The first part of your question is ungrammatical. You can't use (Is +sub.+ should).

husseinhassan posted:

Hi, Bear,

You can say:

1. "Peter parked his car ..."

2. "Peter did park his car ..."

NO. (2) is more emphatic.

The verb 'do' is used to give 'extra force' to the main verb. If you have a look at the 3rd definition of 'do' in LDOCE, you can read that 'do' is used to emphasize the main verb in a sentence, and it mentioned the following example:

You should have warned me.’ ‘But I did warn you.’

 

I agree with Hussein's answer's but I would add a time indication like:

Peter did park his car an hour ago / yesterday, etc.

husseinhassan posted:
The verb 'do' is used to give 'extra force' to the main verb. If you have a look at the 3rd definition of 'do' in LDOCE, you can read that 'do' is used to emphasize the main verb in a sentence, and it mentioned the following example:

You should have warned me.’ ‘But I did warn you.’

That's exactly right, Hussein. In both examples, emphatic "did" (past tense of "do") would also be emphasized in the speaking of the sentence. For example:

A: Peter should have parked his car near the gate of his house.

B: Peter did park his car near the gate of his house. (Go and look.)

Speaker B's sentence could alternatively be "He did park his car there" or, simply, "He did." The point is that B's sentence would NOT naturally be "Peter parked his car there," which gives no emphasis to the assertion (even if "parked" is emphasized, interestingly). The assertion needs emphasizing in the context of my example because Speaker A has implied that he thinks Peter didn't park his car there, and Speaker B is contradicting that assumption.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×