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1.I wonder whether the word "avenge" implicits they avengers are doing something for justice while the word "revenge" refers to something negative.

2.As I know, "avenge" is a transitive word.  But I am not sure whether the sentences below all make sense.

(a) He avenged  his father on the murderer.

(b) He avenged his father's death.

(c) He avenged the murderer who killed his father.

Thanks a lot.

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@Winter posted:

1.I wonder whether the word "avenge" implicits they avengers are doing something for justice while the word "revenge" refers to something negative.

2.As I know, "avenge" is a transitive word.  But I am not sure whether the sentences below all make sense.

(a) He avenged  his father on the murderer.

(b) He avenged his father's death.

(c) He avenged the murderer who killed his father.

Thanks a lot.

Hi, Winter—In my native-speaking experience, which attests to the fact that "avenge" is almost never used in Present-Day English (in the O.E.D., the most recent example is from 1860), the only sentence of yours that works is (b). The other two make no sense to me, except as attempts to say:

  • He took vengeance on the one who murdered his father.
  • He took vengeance on his father's murderer.
Last edited by David, Moderator

Hi, Winter—In my native-speaking experience, which attests to the fact that "avenge" is almost never used in Present-Day English (in the O.E.D., the most recent example is from 1860), the only sentence of yours that works is (b). The other two make no sense to me, except as attempts to say:

  • He took vengeance on the one who murdered his father.
  • He took vengeance on his father's murderer.

OK. So "avenge" is a little bit old-fashioned and obsolete today. Hahaha, I learned the word from the Hollywood blockbusters Avengers. Anyway, thanks a lot.

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