the government would destroy our civil liberties,given ... a chance (all/half/every/both)

Original Post
@Ahmed55 posted:

the government would destroy our civil liberties,given ... a chance (all/half/every/both)

Hi, Ahmed55—Only one of the choices can grammatically be followed by "a chance." Try saying each of the choices. Can you answer your question?

@Ahmed55 posted:

I think half ,but I want to know the meaning of the sentence?

Yes, "half" is the answer.

(Remember that a sentence in English begins with a capital letter and that a space should come between a comma and the word that follows the comma. A space should not be used before a comma. We also use a period at the end of a declarative sentence.)

"Given a chance" would mean "given an opportunity." "Given half a chance" is thus like saying "given half an opportunity." The sentence is saying that if the government were even remotely given an opportunity to destroy your civil liberties, it would do so.

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