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I did hyphenation in these instances:

(1) It was empirically well-grounded thanks to the research.

(2) It could become a project with an actual well-defined target of explanation.

(3) He was in the department doing very well-regarded philosophy-adjacent work.

(4) The issue is whether certain properties hold of a well-designed system.

But not in these instances:

(5) It’s not clear that the question is well formed.

Let me know if I made any errors.

I think that (2) and (3) and (4) are all good, since the "well-X" is in the position before the noun, whereas (1) might be wrong and might require dehyphenation.

And I think that (5) is fine, since the part in bold comes after the noun.

Thanks so much!

Last edited by Andrew Van Wagner
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Hi, Andrew,

I did hyphenation in these instances:

(1) It was empirically well-grounded thanks to the research.

(2) It could become a project with an actual well-defined target of explanation.

(3) He was in the department doing very well-regarded philosophy-adjacent work.

(4) The issue is whether certain properties hold of a well-designed system.

But not in these instances:

(5) It’s not clear that the question is well formed.

Let me know if I made any errors.

I think that (2) and (3) and (4) are all good, since the "well-X" is in the position before the noun, whereas (1) might be wrong and might require dehyphenation.

And I think that (5) is fine, since the part in bold comes after the noun.

Thanks so much!

I think I agree with you about all these points. From 'The best punctuation book, period', by June Casagrande:

Compound adjective with well
(B) (S) (A) Hyphenate before but not after a noun: the well-known man is also
well loved
.
(N) Hyphenate before or after a noun: the well-known man is also well-loved.

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