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I wonder  if both choices are  each correct in the below examples.

Thank you in advance.

1 I worked late to finish the project although I was not required to (do it/do).

2 That Christmas present was not what I had been (hoping/hoping for).

3 This is not the way I have been (hoping/hoping for)

Last edited by GBLSU
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Hi, GBLSU—You should use a comma before the "although"-clause in (1). With that comma added, the sentence is correct with "do it" and incorrect with just "do."

It is possible that some British speakers would accept (1) with just "do" at the end, but in American English that is totally ungrammatical. You could, however, just end the sentence with "to" (eliding "work late to finish it"):

  • I worked late to finish the project although I was not required to.

Sentence (3) is bad whether you use "hoping" or "hoping for." What are you trying to say? As for (2), the sentence is ungrammatical with just "hoping." "For" needs to be there. You cannot hope a present.

Hi, GBLSU—You should use a comma before the "although"-clause in (1). With that comma added, the sentence is correct with "do it" and incorrect with just "do."

It is possible that some British speakers would accept (1) with just "do" at the end, but in American English that is totally ungrammatical. You could, however, just end the sentence with "to" (eliding "work late to finish it"):

  • I worked late to finish the project although I was not required to.

Sentence (3) is bad whether you use "hoping" or "hoping for." What are you trying to say? As for (2), the sentence is ungrammatical with just "hoping." "For" needs to be there. You cannot hope a present.

Thank you so much.

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