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Greetings, grammar experts!

Consider: Under the deep blue sea, fish swam.

'Under the deep blue sea' is not a dependent clause because it has no verb and is therefore not a clause at all. It is an adverbial prepositional phrase modifying swim (I think.)

Is this prepositional phrase considered part of the predicate of the sentence even though it has a comma after it?

In other words, is the predicate.... "swam"

or is the predicate... "Under the deep blue sea, ____ swam."

Perhaps I am wrong to believe this is a grammatically correct sentence?

Bonus question:

Is it considered part of the independent clause, or do you just say this is a prepositional phrase followed by a common and an independent clause?

Thanks.

Last edited by cwm9
Original Post

Hello, cwm9, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

@cwm9 posted:

Consider: Under the deep blue sea, fish swam.

'Under the deep blue sea' is not a dependent clause because it has no verb and is therefore not a clause at all. It is an adverbial prepositional phrase modifying swim (I think.)

Is this prepositional phrase considered part of the predicate of the sentence even though it has a comma after it?

In other words, is the predicate.... "swam"

or is the predicate... "Under the deep blue sea, ____ swam."

"Under the deep blue sea" is an adverbial adjunct of place that forms part of the predicate. Its front position for stylistic purposes causes a disruption of the normal word order (Fish swam under the deep blue sea) and this disruption leads to the use of the comma. However, the phrase continues to form part of the predicate.

@cwm9 posted:

Is it considered part of the independent clause, or do you just say this is a prepositional phrase followed by a common and an independent clause?

It forms part of the predicate of the independent, or main clause.

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