Humour, as is well- known, raises one of the most unbreakable intercultural barriers. Who, when, and about what people are having a laugh- is a question that psychologists, anthropologists, and philosophers have been asking themselves for a long time.

 I made up these two sentences, and I have doubts whether they sound properly in English.

Last edited by zigzag
Original Post

Hi, zigzag,

As most members know, the Grammar Exchange is not a proofreading site. We can answer specific questions you may have about grammar or the English language in general, but are not expected to assess the correctness of a whole text. It'd be great if you could ask specific questions about the text you wrote (which does contain some issues) rather than ask us if it sounds like proper English.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor
zigzag posted:

     Who, when, and about what people are having a laugh- is a question that psychologists, anthropologists, and philosophers have been asking themselves for a long time.

In the first place, I'd do away with the hyphen/dash separating the subject from the predicate. The most problematic part, however, is the subject. Why present continuous? Is it only one question? Also, I think "who" clashes with "people." Try to revise it considering these suggestions.

What/which/ cultures consider something laughable; when they consider it as such; what they consider appropriate to laugh about? Should a sentence be that long!? 

 'What to be considered is: who, when, or at what people laugh? This is the question that.......'

 Is it grammatical now?

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