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I have the following:

https://join.substack.com/p/ar...y-theories-dangerous

“OK, people don’t really want to talk about Vietnam, but I can do a movie about the JFK assassination and that way I can slide Vietnam into the conversation.”

I'm not sure if "OK" applies to the bold; one might imagine that I'd put a period after "Vietnam" and "capitalize "but" and make a new sentence starting with "But I can do a movie..." if I wanted "OK" to not apply to the bold, but I'm not sure if that logic is strong enough to actually eliminate the ambiguity.

I guess that I don't want the ambiguity and that I do indeed want "OK" to apply to the bold.

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Hi, Andrew—No, "OK" does not apply to the part of the sentence in bold. It applies only to the first clause. That clause spells out the meaning of "OK" in the context; it is the proposition to which "OK" expresses assent. It's like saying: "I recognize that people don't really want to talk about Vietnam."

Notice that it would be possible to have: "OK, but I can do a movie about the JFK assassination. That way I can slide Vietnam into the conversation." Even in this case, "OK" would not apply to the "but"-clause, which expresses an alternative to that which has been contextually assented to with "OK."

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