Dear experts,

Will it be right to assume that DRAW BREATH cannot be replaced by DRAW A BREATH in these specific contexts (resp. meanings):

1. pause to rest after exertion; take a break: Then they stoked in silence till Dan drew breath over his tin cup.
2. be relieved after exertion, excitement, etc.: Then the amnesty came and white Africa drew breath again with certain grave reflections left in her head.

Thank you,
Yuri

Last edited {1}
Original Post
Both of your sentences go better with "draw a breath." According to several references, "draw breath" means just to breathe. "Draw a breath" fits with both your definitions.

There may be a British usage that I'm not aware of. Readers?

Rachel
Last edited {1}

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