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Hi, M. Mamdouh,

@M.Mamdouh posted:
I had two eggs for breakfast and ______ of them was fresh.

A) either

B) neither

C) no

D) none
I think the right answer may be "neither"-- but why?

Since there are 'two' eggs, 'd' doesn't work here. 'C' is ungrammatical. 'Either' sounds odd and meaningless here. The only meaningful choice is (b) 'neither'. In fact, what I find more natural to say is:

- I had two eggs for breakfast, but neither of them was fresh.

Last edited by ahmed_btm

The base word here is "either" which has a positive sense i.e. one egg or the other and in the example  sentence would be somewhat ungrammatical. Better - "and either were fresh i.e.  a positive response to a negative situation where eggs tend to not be fresh.

"Neither" has a negative sense being a compression of "not either" i.e. not either of the two eggs were fresh. A response to a positive situation where eggs are normally fresh

I think it fair to use ' either ' here if it is something to do with the choice between the things  .
If the sentence is expected to be only in the positive sense
Can't we say as
'I had two eggs for breakfast and either was fresh ' , if I was let to take only one of them ?
If I was allowed them both , we can say
' I had two eggs for breakfast and they both were fresh .

I agree. Perhaps to make the sentence more succinct, "There were two eggs for breakfast, both fresh."  The choice of one or both is implied.

'I had two eggs for breakfast and either was fresh ' , if I was let to take only one of them ?

I think it's grammatically correct but unneccessary. I suggest  'I had two eggs for breakfast, each was(or, both were) fresh "Either/neither" relates  to active choice, by having consequences (an unpleasant egg). In this case choice is inconsequential as both are fresh

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