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In the past, governments (had talked/would talk) about solving problems, but they didn't use to do anything.

In the above paragraph, I want to know which is the right answer, ''had talked or would talk''. I think it's ''had talk''. But I need an explanation. Pls somebody, help me. Many thanks in advance.

Last edited by David, Moderator
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@Pone Nya posted:

In the past, governments (had talked/would talk) about solving problems, but they didn't use to do anything.

In the above paragraph, I want to know which is the right answer, ''had talked or would talk''. I think it's ''had talk''. But I need an explanation. Pls somebody, help me. Many thanks in advance.

Hello, Pone Nya, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

The answer is "would talk," not "had talked," because the meaning is past habitual. "Would talk" is another way of saying "used to talk," which and "used to" is used in the second part of the sentence:

  • In the past, governments would talk about solving problems, but they didn't used to do anything (about them).

P.S. I have changed the title of this thread from "English Grammar," which is completely uninformative at an English grammar forum, to "had talked / would talk." Please have a look at our Guidelines page for information on posting.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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