There are times when you can't work ……..to live comfortably.
(a) enough hard
(b) hard enough
(c) hardly enough
(d) too hard

This is sentence is one of the mock exams in Egypt.

I have chosen (b). However, I can't get why (d) is wrong, if it is actually wrong.

I really appreciate your help.

Original Post
Rasha Assem posted:

There are times when you can't work ……..to live comfortably.
(a) enough hard
(b) hard enough
(c) hardly enough
(d) too hard

This is sentence is one of the mock exams in Egypt.

I have chosen (b). However, I can't get why (d) is wrong, if it is actually wrong.

Hello, Rasha,

Answer (d) is not wrong. It is a better answer than (b), though both answers are grammatical. Answer (d), however, is the answer that makes more sense.

(d) There are times when you can't work too hard to live comfortably.

The sentence means that there are times when living comfortably requires so much work that there is no such thing as working too hard for it.

Thanks for the clear explanation.
I've got two more questions, please.
1- What does the sentence with (b) as an answer mean?
2- If 'too' is preceded with a negative verb, I get confused and can't understand meaning of the sentence clearly. Is there a way to get past that? The problem arises from the fact that I automatically add a negative meaning to verb following the 'to'. In other worsd, when we read "I am too short to reach the shelf" I interpret the sentence as follows "I am very short. I can't reach the shelf."

 

I really appreciate your help and the time you spend answering my posts. THANKS.

Rasha Assem posted:

I've got two more questions, please.
1- What does the sentence with (b) as an answer mean?

Hi, Rasha,

Here is the sentence with answer (b):

(b) There are times when you can't work hard enough to live comfortably.

That sentence means that there are times when you can't afford to live comfortably no matter how hard you work.

Rasha Assem posted:

2- If 'too' is preceded with a negative verb, I get confused and can't understand meaning of the sentence clearly. Is there a way to get past that? The problem arises from the fact that I automatically add a negative meaning to verb following the 'to'. In other worsd, when we read "I am too short to reach the shelf" I interpret the sentence as follows "I am very short. I can't reach the shelf."

Well, let's add sentential negation to "I am too short to reach the shelf":

(X) I am not too short to reach the shelf.

That sentence means you are short but you can nevertheless reach the shelf.

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