Hello,

I understand that "equipment" is an uncountable noun.

So, it cannot be replaced with "one".

The following sentence is wrong.

Ken replaced the broken equipment with new one.

Am I correct ?

Apple

 

 

Original Post
apple posted:

I understand that "equipment" is an uncountable noun.
So, it cannot be replaced with "one".
The following sentence is wrong.

Ken replaced the broken equipment with new one.

Hi, Apple,

Yes, you are right on all counts. Even in contexts in which "new one" can be used, it would be "with a new one" not "with new one."

The alternatives des3 has given are OK. If you wanted to be able to use "with a new one," you would need to put "piece of" between "broken" and "equipment":

  • Ken replaced the broken piece of equipment with a new one.

That means, of course, that Ken replaced the broken piece of equipment with a new piece of equipment.

Beautiful picture, Apple!

It's funny. In order to find my image of three crisply delineated clouds, I had to sort through a lot of pictures like the one you've shared!

Interestingly, "cloud" (like many other nouns that are primarily count nouns) can also be used as a noncount noun. Here are some examples from COCA:

  • "The day was warm and windy with thin streaks of cloud painted across the sky"
  • ". . . the heavens utterly unobstructed by even the thinnest ribbon of cloud."
  • "Between black blots of cloud, the stars were stunningly bright but did nothing to illuminate the street."
  • ". . . itself topped by a purely white stratum of cloud."
  • ". . . the world below lost in an ocean of cloud and vapor."

Fortunately, we also have the adjective "cloudy" and attributive-noun constructions like "cloud cover."

Thank you, David, for this interesting discussion.

So you had to sort through a lot of pictures to find a one with clouds whose contour lines are clear enough so that the clouds can actually be counted. That can mean there are more situations where it's difficult to actually count clouds. When you see a lot of clouds, would you rather say "It's very cloudy" than " There are a lot of clouds in the sky"?

Apple

apple posted:
When you see a lot of clouds, would you rather say "It's very cloudy" than " There are a lot of clouds in the sky"?

Hi, Apple,

Sorry for the delay. That's an interesting question.

I think that I tend to speak of there being "a lot of clouds" when the clouds are at least somewhat countable, that is, when there are a lot of spaces between them and they are not the type of clouds that span vast distances.

When the sky is "clouded over" -- when I look up and see a quilt of clouds or a bulging amorphous conglomeration of puffiness all over the sky -- then I definitely tend to use the adjective "cloudy" instead.

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