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I was talking to a guy who's just a beginner and couldn't speak English properly but he was acting like he knows everything already and was saying things that were very offensive. So I said to someone:

"Even after knowing that I'm an advanced learner and I speak better English than him he was acting like he knows everything."

Is 'even after knowing' a natural thing to say? Another example:

"Even after meeting me backstage she told them that she doesn't even know me."

Last edited by Ashraful Haque
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Hi, Ashraful,

The verb "know" is not, like "meet," an action or dynamic verb but a stative one. I think this would be more appropriate:

- Even knowing that I'm an advanced learner and I speak better English than him he was acting like he knew everything. (Notice the past to refer to the way how he acted.)

"Even after" could be used with other verbs like realize, discover, learn, get to know, confirm.

For the second sentence, I'd only change the tense inside the reported sentence:

- Even after meeting me backstage she told them that she didn't even know me.

Hi, Ashraful,

The verb "know" is not, like "meet," an action or dynamic verb but a stative one. I think this would be more appropriate:

- Even knowing that I'm an advanced learner and I speak better English than him he was acting like he knew everything. (Notice the past to refer to the way how he acted.)

"Even after" could be used with other verbs like realize, discover, learn, get to know, confirm.

For the second sentence, I'd only change the tense inside the reported sentence:

- Even after meeting me backstage she told them that she didn't even know me.

To be honest I've never heard anyone saying 'even knowing.' Is it a natural thing to say?

 

As I said in my initial reply, the present works finely to describe how a person acts, and only the past works well to describe how a person acted.

- He acts as if he knows everything. (Perhaps he does.)
- He acted as if he knew everything. (Perhaps he did.)

We can also say:

- He acts as if he knew everything.

to mean that he actually doesn't know everything.

and:

- He acted as if he had known everything.

to mean that he actually didn't know everything.

As I said in my initial reply, the present works finely to describe how a person acts, and only the past works well to describe how a person acted.

- He acts as if he knows everything. (Perhaps he does.)
- He acted as if he knew everything. (Perhaps he did.)

 

Is it always a good idea to keep the entire sentence in the past even when I'm just repeating what someone did/said earlier for example:

Someone said this several times to me- "there is a dog behind you" and later I said- "I was looking in another direction when you were saying that there was a dog behind me."

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