Hello, everyone,

quote:
But then he [Descartes] pointed out that the finite minds and bodies were not substances in the
strict sense of the term, since they did require God as their creator. But, with this one qualification, they were as self-sufficient as God.


JOHN B. COBB, JR. & DAVID RAY GRIFFIN, PROCESS THEOLOGY An Introductory Exposition

When I read the sentence in bold face, I feel there should be an 'even' or 'despite' preceding 'with this one qualification'? Why am I wrong in thinking so?

Thanks.
Original Post
quote:
When I read the sentence in bold face, I feel there should be an 'even' or 'despite' preceding 'with this one qualification'?
Hi, Ahmad,

When I read that sentence, I don't feel as you do. Please note that "despite with this one qualification" would be ungrammatical; I believe you meant to say that you feel the phrase should either read "even with this one qualification" or "despite this one qualification" (where "despite" replaces "with").

The context here is quite metaphysical, Ahmad. Normally we speak of things like going to the grocery store in discussions of grammar, but you want to talk about the theoretical independence of mind, body, and God as metaphysical substances within the philosophies of Descartes and Leibniz.

Why don't you tell me why you feel the need for "even"?
davidmoderator posted:

Why don't you tell me why you feel the need for "even"?
 

Hi, David,

The absence of ‘even’ in the sentence seems to me saying that it is the qualification which makes them (the other two substances) self-sufficient. However, when I imagine an ‘even’, or for that purpose a ‘despite’, that seems to make more sense.  Perhaps my interpretation, the one lacking an even,  has more to do with punctuation; I am not so sure, but I have you nonetheless to help me out.

Thanks.

PS: I am sorry for having taken so much time to reply. 

 

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