every game I play

Are these sentences correct:

1) Each game I play, I consider as a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament.
2) Every game I play, I consider as a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament.

If they are correct, would you consider them literary or informal?

Gratefully,
Navi

Original Post
navi posted:

Are these sentences correct:

1) Each game I play, I consider as a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament.
2) Every game I play, I consider as a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament.

If they are correct, would you consider them literary or informal?

Hello, Navi,

In both sentences, you have topicalized (fronted) the direct object of "consider," such that (1) is equivalent to "I consider each game I play as a new challenge," and (2) to "I consider every game I play as a new challenge."

Although it is possible to use "consider" in that pattern, the pattern is more common with "regard." With "consider," we generally dispense with "as" and go straight to the object complement. I find both sentences awkward. I recommend:

(1a) Each game I play, I consider a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament. (= I consider each game I play a new challenge.)

(2a) Every game I play, I consider a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament. (= I consider every game I play a new challenge.)

(1b) Each game I play, I regard as a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament. (= I regard each game I play as a new challenge.)

(2b) Every game I play, I regard as a new challenge, even if it isn't in an important tournament. (= I regard every game I play as a new challenge.)

Sentences (1a) and (2a) are ambiguous. "Each/every game I play" can be considered a time adverbial -- as in the song "Every Move You Make (I'll Be Watching You")," by The Police.

"A new challenge" is the object of "consider" on that interpretation. Sentences (1b) and (2b) avoid the ambiguity. I suppose I have a slight preference for "each." As to their being literary or informal, topicalization is often used in literature.

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