extremely precise device

Are all of these sentences correct and correctly punctuated:

1) This is a device that is extremely precise for people in the medical field.

2) This is an extremely precise device for people in the medical field.

3) This is a device that is extremely precise, for people in the medical field.

4) This is an extremely precise device, for people in the medical field.

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5) This is a device that is extremely expensive for people in the medical field.

6) This is an extremely expensive device for people in the medical field.

 

Aren't '5' and '6' ambiguous?

 

Gratefully,

Navi

 

Original Post

Hi, Navi,

I think the comma in (3) an (4) could only be justified if what follows is an afterthought, equivalent to: I mean, for people in the medical field.

I think the relative clauses in (1), (3) and (5) make the connection between the adjective and the "for"-phrase more evident: precise for them to use, expensive for them to buy.

In all cases, but mainly in (2), (4) and (6), the "for"-phrase can be understood as I explained in the previous paragraph or as meaning "in their opinion." Is that the ambiguity you had in mind, Navi?

Thank you very much, Gustavo,

I have been thinking about this some more. I don't think '5' is really ambiguous. If something is expensive for me, that means it will be difficult for me to afford it. But maybe one might argue that there is a different meaning in which 'for' would simply mean 'according to'. Not sure. One could argue that if it is hard for me to afford something, I'd consider that thing expensive.

I thought '6' could mean:

a) This is an extremely expensive device and it has been designed for people in the medical field.

and also:

b) People in the medical field will have a hard time affording this instrument. 

Gratefully,

Navi

 

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