Dear experts,

Could you possibly provide definition for FAR AND AWAY as used in these specific contexts:

1. Although there are scores of guests, there are also days when everyone else in the house is out and away and she writes a melancholy note on loneliness.

2. The 'loft' is out and away from the house which allows for your privacy. In the loft is a private bath, full sized bed, decorated in country primitive style.

Thank you,
Yuri

Last edited {1}
Original Post
"Far and away" has a definition different from what you mean, I think. "Far and away" can't be substituted for the words "out and away" in your sentences.

First, "out and away," when used as an expression as in your sentences, does not express the idea of being out of someplace and/or away from someplace. One idea is expressed by "out" or "out of," and another is expressed by "away" or "away from." In your sentences, the idea of "outside" and "not near" could be expressed by:

1. Although there are scores of guests, there are also days when everyone else in the house is out (or away) and she writes a melancholy note on loneliness.

2. The "loft" is separate, and away from the house.....
_______

"Far and away" means "by far." The expressions act as intensifiers, not to express being separate or away or both. This definition comes from The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms*:

"by far
Also, far and away. To the greatest degree, by a large margin. For example, She is by far the most experienced member of the cast, or, as Anthony Trollope wrote, "He was far and away the cleverest of his party."
_______

"Out and away" does have an idiomatic meaning, but it, too, means "by far." Here is its definition from the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language**:

"out and away
adv.

By far: She's out and away the best swimmer on the team."

This usage of "out and away" is not frequent, at least in AmE.

Rachel
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*The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. 1997. Houghton Mifflin Company
**The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition 2003. Houghton Mifflin Company

Last edited {1}
Addendum to "Far and away" response:

There is another similar expression, as you no doubt know: "far away," which means distant or remote.

Your sentences could read:

1. Although there are scores of guests, there are also days when everyone else in the house is FAR AWAY and she writes a melancholy note on loneliness.

2. The 'loft' is FAR AWAY from the house which allows for your privacy. In the loft is a private bath, full sized bed, decorated in country primitive style.

Rachel

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