Hi, iwtk,

I think you could get responses if you were to rephrase your original question like this:

I have two questions for (1).

(1) It depends on for how long you want the car.

#1 Is it possible to delete "for" as in (2a)?
#2 Is it also possible to put "for" at the end of the sentence as in (2b)?

(2) a. It depends on how long you want the car.
b. It depends on how long you want the car for.

Seiichi MYOGA

cf.
(i) a. What do you want the car for?
b.*For what do you want the car?
c.* What do you want the car?
(ii) We stayed there (for) three days.
Hi, Myoga,
_______________________________________________________
I think you could get responses if you were to rephrase your original question like this:
_______________________________________________________

Thank you so much for that. I truly appreciated your effort, but I hate to say that I couldn't follow that unfortunately. T.T

Iwtk
In short, Iwtk, you can omit for and still have a grammatical question. Smile

What Seiichi is saying is that we can choose to use for in front of the time phrase how long, or we can omit it:

It depends on for how long you want the car.
It depends on how long you want the car.


If we choose to keep for, we normally postpose it (place it after everything) and say

It depends on how long want the car for.

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