I'd like to discuss the difference between the following and check my understanding of them

1) We are staying here for another two months.

= a present situation with a future meaning.

2) We lived there for a long time.

= A) We don't live there anymore. 
   B) The period of time mentioned doesn't include this year, the year we're in.
   C) No connection to the present or the future.

3) We've been living there for a long time.
= One reading:
                          A) We still live there.
                          B) The focus is on the duration.
                          C) It's temporary.
= Another reading:
                          A) We stopped living there at the time of speaking or nearly.
                          B) The focus is on the duration.
                         c) There is a possibility that we live there again.


4) We've lived there for a long time.
= One Possibility 
                        A) We don't live there anymore.
                        B) It's possible that we live there again, or is some result in the
                             present of living there for a long time.
= Another reading 
It can have the two readings of the Present Perfect Cont. The difference is that 'live' with the present perfect is treated more like a state verb. 

Original Post

Hello, Rasha,

rashaassem posted:

1) We are staying here for another two months.

= a present situation with a future meaning.

Yes, that's right.

rashaassem posted:

2) We lived there for a long time.

= A) We don't live there anymore. 
   B) The period of time mentioned doesn't include this year, the year we're in.
   C) No connection to the present or the future.

"Yes" for (A), "no" for (B), and "no" for (C). You don't live there any more, but you could have lived there yesterday, and the fact that you lived there for a long time could have many connections with the present. For example, someone might ask you where you have lived in the last ten years, and you would need to report all the places in which you had lived during that time period.

rashaassem posted:
3) We've been living there for a long time.

= One reading:
                          A) We still live there.
                          B) The focus is on the duration.
                          C) It's temporary.
= Another reading:
                          A) We stopped living there at the time of speaking or nearly.
                          B) The focus is on the duration.
                         c) There is a possibility that we live there again.

Yes, you seem to understand the sentence correctly. I don't know what you mean in the second (C), though. Did you mean to say, "There is a possibility that we will live there again?" If so, the answer is "yes." It's not exactly part of the grammar of the sentence, but the sentence doesn't exclude the possibility of your moving back and living there again.

rashaassem posted:

4) We've lived there for a long time.
= One Possibility 
                        A) We don't live there anymore.
                        B) It's possible that we live there again, or is some result in the
                             present of living there for a long time.
= Another reading 
It can have the two readings of the Present Perfect Cont. The difference is that 'live' with the present perfect is treated more like a state verb. 

Yes, you seem to have understood (4). You can use if you still live there or if you recently stopped living there. It's hard to tell what you are trying to say in (B).

First of all, thank you sooooooo much for spending all that time reading and correcting my interpretations.

1) Yes, I missed the ' will'.
I meant ;There is a possibility that we will live there again.'

2) As for the fourth sentence, the 'B' point wasn't written correctly.

We've lived there for a long time.
= One Possibility 
           2-A) We don't live there anymore. (We stopped living there recently)
          2- B) The focus is on the result of the completed action. For example, and
                    now we have to look for a new house. 

AM I correct?

3) One last thing 
We lived/have lived there for a long time.
Sometimes both  tenses mean that we don't live there anymore. So can the difference be that
3-A) The Past Simple is used to talk about a past completed action in a definite/ specific time, i.e. the speaker and the listener know when the long period of time started and ended exactly.
3-B) The Present Perfect, more often means that they are still living there, has a possible reading which is that they don't live there any more. Then, to differentiate it from the past, can we say that, with the present perfect, the past completed action means that the period of time is indefinite, i.e. the starting and the ending points of long period of time are not specific, unlike the Past Simple? 

   

Rasha Assem,

I can't improve on the excellent responses that David has given so far.

I do, however, find this thread particularly frustrating in its repetition of index numbers and letters.  If I were to say that I find (A) perfectly acceptable, how would you or anyone else be able to determine which of the (at least) six (A)s I'm referring to?  In the future, please use unique indices.  If they are variations on examples you have already given, you can make this clear by using a prime symbol ((A'), being a variation on the previously mentioned (A)), or adding a number to a letter, or a letter to a number ((2a), being a variation on the previously mentioned (2)).  These aren't hard and fast rules on this forum, but these guidelines do help us all to understand, especially in longer threads (and we never really know how long they will be).

Regarding your second (3):

3) One last question
We lived/have lived there for a long time.
Sometimes both can mean that we don't live there anymore. So I thought that maybe the past simple can be for just stating a past state because of its simple aspect. While the present perfect can be connecting this completed action to the present or the future because of its perfective aspect.

It is true that both can mean that we don't live there anymore.  I would say that the past simple makes that crystal clear, unless it is followed by something like "and then we moved back".  The present perfect can potentially mean that we don't live there anymore, but, in that case, it would necessarily mean that we just recently moved out, or are presently in the process of moving out.  Unless otherwise indicated, I would normally understand the present perfect to mean that we are still living there, and we will be living there tomorrow and tomorrow, possibly until death parts us.

This completely contradicts the grammatical meaning of "perfect" that I was taught in school.  I was taught that "perfect" specifically means "completed action".

The last (alleged) sentence from your "last question" makes no sense at all.  Can you rephrase it, please?

Thanks,

DocV

Rasha Assem,

I'm going to stand by my previous explanation.  The past simple strongly suggests that we are no longer living there, and the present perfect strongly suggests that we still are, although there are other possible interpretations.

As to your rewrite, the choice of tense has no bearing on whether anybody knows just how long "a long time" is or was.

Obviously, since the subject of all of your examples is "we", it is likely that "I" know exactly when "we" moved in and out.  If we substitute a third-person subject, however:

5a: My neighbor, Mr Cooper, lived there for a long time.
5b: My neighbor, Mr Cooper, has lived there for a long time.

once again, we see that (5a) suggests that Mr Cooper no longer lives there, and that (5b) suggests that he does.  But neither sentence gives any indication of whether I know exactly how long he lived there, or when he moved in.

Of course, "a long time" is very subjective.  If I say "I had to wait in the doctor's office for an extremely long time", I'm probably talking about hours, whereas if I said "Mr Cooper has been living there for a rather long time", I'm probably talking about years.

Regards,

DocV

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