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Hello, everyone,

“Pre-emption means that a strategy is designed to prevent a rival from starting some particular activity. In some case a pre-emptive move may simply be an announcement of some intent that might discourage rivals from doing the same. The idea of pre-emption implies that timing is sometimes very important — a decision or an action at one point in time might be much more rewarding than doing it at a different time point. Pre-emption may involve up-weighting advertising for a period before and during when a new entrant launches into a market. The intent is to make it more difficult for the new entrant’s advertising to make an impression on potential buyers. Product proliferation is another potential pre-emption strategy. The general idea is to launch a large variety of product variants so that there is very little in the way of market demand that are not accommodated. Arguably, if a market is already filled with product variants it is more difficult for competitors to find untapped pockets of market demand.”

1. While I think the ‘when’ in the underlined part above should be replaced with ‘which’ because the preceding noun is ’a period’, is my guess plausible?

2. Alternatively, is there a possibility that ‘the time’ has been left out as in “ ... for a period before and during (the time) when a new entrant ...“?

I would appreciate your valuable opinions.

* source; 'Marketing Planning & Strategy: A Practical Introduction'

Last edited by deepcosmos
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Hi, Deepcosmos,

@deepcosmos posted:

1. While I think the ‘when’ in the underlined part above should be replaced with ‘which’ because the preceding noun is ’a period’, is my guess plausible?



I agree with you, but what makes me feel that 'which' is the natural one to use is the presence of the preposition 'during'. 'During which' = 'When'. However, if we replaced 'during which' with 'when' here, there would be another problem: That's the presence of another preposition 'before'. 'When' doesn't convey the meanings of 'before and during'.

@deepcosmos posted:

2. Alternatively, is there a possibility that ‘the time’ has been left out as in “ ... for a period before and during (the time) when a new entrant ...“?



If you insert 'the time', 'when' will be grammatically correct.

Last edited by ahmed_btm
@ahmed_btm posted:

I agree with you, but what makes me feel that 'which' is the natural one to use is the presence of the preposition 'during'. 'During which' = 'When'. However, if we replaced 'during which' with 'when' here, there would be another problem: That's the presence of another preposition 'before'. 'When' doesn't convey the meanings of 'before and during'.

If you insert 'the time', 'when' will be grammatically correct.

Hi, Ahmed_btm, thanks for your opinion.

Hello, Martin S., and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

You could have started a new thread, because your question is not closely related to the previous posts.

@Former Member posted:

"[...] to develop what would later be known as the School of Microbiology of the Universidad de Antioquia. Which, by proxy, established the Department of Microbiology at the Universidad del Valle, in Cali—highly regarded as well.

Anyway, and without evaluating other aspects of your text, the answer is negative — you cannot start a sentence with relative "which." You should try with a noun phrase that refers to the antecedent in question, such as: This institution in turn established the Department of Microbiology ...

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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