Hello, teachers!
In both sentences, can we use both 'for' and 'during'?
1. I went to the Philippines last year. / How long were you there? / [For, During] the whole summer.
2. He lived in the Philippines [for, during] his whole boyhood.

Thank you very much.
Enjoy the getting-warmer weather.
Best Regards.

Original Post
"For" is used to measure the duration of time, to say for how long something lasts. Here are some examples:

"¢ Sally was in the hospital for (NOT during) ten days when she had her hip operation. (NOT during)

"¢ We'd been driving for (NOT during) four hours when the tire blew out.

"¢ They're renting a car for (NOT during) a month and touring around the country.

"¢ I went to the Philippines last year. / How long were you there? / For (NOT during) the whole summer.

_______

"During" is used to say when something happens, within a certain time frame:

"¢ The students have to read ten books during (NOT for) their summer vacation.

"¢ Bobby fell asleep during (NOT for) the television program.

"¢ At some time during (NOT for) March, the flowers will be planted.

"¢ He lived in the Philippines during (POSSIBLY for) his whole boyhood.

This sentence could possibly be "for his whole boyhood" if you consider his boyhood as a measurable time frame.

Rachel
Which one of the following is correct?

1. The Olympic Games helped to keep peace among the pugnacious states of the Greek world, for a sacred truce was proclaimed during the month of the festival.

2. The Olympic Games helped to keep peace among the pugnacious states of the Greek world when they proclaimed a sacred truce for the month of the festival.

Thanks.
Which one of the following is correct?

1. The Olympic Games helped to keep peace among the pugnacious states of the Greek world, for a sacred truce was proclaimed during the month of the festival.

2. The Olympic Games helped to keep peace among the pugnacious states of the Greek world when they proclaimed a sacred truce for the month of the festival.

Thanks.

Ven
_______
_______

Depending on what the speaker wants to say, either "for" or "during" could be correct.
_______

In the first sentence, "during" indicates that the sacred truce took place sometime within the month of the festival, but not for the entire month of the festival.

However, the sentence might, instead, refer to the proclamation of the sacred truce at some time within the month of the festival.

So it is not entirely clear whether a truce took place or a proclamation took place. Whichever one, though, took place while the festival was going on.
_______

The second sentence indicates that the truce took place from one end of the festival to the other, from beginning to end, for the entire month of the festival.

"For" measures the complete duration of the time stated, in this case, the month of the festival.

Rachel
Hello, teachers!
Let me confirm my thought, please!

[1] We had a good time together [for, during] the five days in Paris.
According to the context or meaning, both are possible, but the following are more natural and preferred. Am I right?
a. We had a good time together for five days in Paris.
b. We had a good time together during the five days in Paris.

[2] He watched television [for, during] the two hours that his parents was out.
In this case, because he watched TV all the time, "for" is much more reasonable, isn't it?

[3] He didn't eat or drink anything [for, during] the ten hours in flight.
In this case, both are OK, because we can emphasize the duration and usually we don't eat all the time on plane. Am I right?

Thank you very much.
Enjoy the spring rain expediting new, green leaves.
Best Regards.
My responses to Hogel's questions in italics:

Hello, teachers!

Let me confirm my thought, please!

[1] We had a good time together [for, during] the five days in Paris.

According to the context or meaning, both are possible, but the following are more natural and preferred. Am I right?

a. We had a good time together for five days in Paris.

Yes, this sentence is fine without the article as you've put it to measure the duration of time in Paris – five days. However, there could also be the article if "the five days in Paris" are five days known to both the speaker and the listener:

A: So did you have a good time on your trip?
B: Yes and no. We spent five especially wonderful days in Paris.
A: What about the rest of the trip?
B: It was awful. We had a good time together for the five days in Paris, but after that everyone was so sick we couldn't enjoy anything.


b. We had a good time together during the five days in Paris.

This is correct.

Here's another point: "during" can sometimes mean "for the entire time," although it usually means "at some point inside the period of time." If there is a verb indicating duration, or another word meaning "the whole time," "during" can refer to the entire time span.

Here, because "the five days in Paris" means the entire five days that both speaker and listener know and refers to a continuous, uninterrupted period of having a good time, "during" probably means "all during the time."

If you want to clearly indicate that some but not all of the time in Paris was happy, how about:

We had some good times together during the five days in Paris.
We had a good time together during part of the five days in Paris.


[2] He watched television [for, during] the two hours that his parents was out.
In this case, because he watched TV all the time, "for" is much more reasonable, isn't it?

Yes, if he watched for the entire two hours. Or, you could use an additional word with "during" to indicate the entire time. These four sentences mean the same thing:

He watched television for the two hours that his parents were out.
He watched television ALL during the two hours that his parents were out.
He watched television during the WHOLE two hours that his parents were out.
as well as
He watched television for the whole two hours that his parents were out.

Otherwise, use "during" to refer to some time within those two hours:

During the two hours that his parents were out, he watched television for a while. Then he fell asleep on the sofa.


[3] He didn't eat or drink anything [for, during] the ten hours in flight.
In this case, both are OK, because we can emphasize the duration and usually we don't eat all the time on plane. Am I right?

These sentences refer to all the time of the flight:

He didn't eat or drink anything for the ten hours in flight.
He didn't eat or drink anything all during the ten hours in flight.
He didn't eat or drink anything during the whole ten hours in flight.

This sentence refers to any one time or times within the ten hours of the flight:

He didn't eat or drink anything during the ten hours in flight.

_______

Rachel

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