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Hi, everyone, I read the sentence “Prior to the late 1880s, most of us were so busy trying to make a living that we didn’t care what the Joneses were doing, nor did we know, for that matter. ” in an English textbook. "for that matter" here is given the meaning "as far as...is concerned". I find such an explaination a bit awkward. I consulted the editor of the textbook and was told that "for that matter" meaning "as far as....is concerned" was proper and taken from the Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary. The editor even showed me her paraphrase of the sentence " we didn't care what the Joneses were doing nor did we know what they were doing as far as the matter of keeping up with the Joneses is concerned."

Could you clarify for me the meaning of "for that matter" here? I find "for that matter" can be explained as "used to say that what you are saying about one thing is also true about something else", so "for that matter" here is similar to "either". But the editor said it was wrong to explain "for that matter" in this way and claimed that "for that matter" meaning "as far as...is concerned"  is totally acceptable in this sentence.   

Thanks a lot for your clarification.

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