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The world’s three top central bankers (Greenspan, Duisenberg and Hayami) are all close to the top of the alphabet, even if one of them really uses Japanese characters. As are the world’s five richest men (Gates, Buffett, Allen, Ellison and Albrecht).

( The Economist, 30 Aug 2001)



Hi-

Is that full stop used correctly?  I think a normal version would be:

1. ...even if one of them really uses Japanese characters. So are the world’s five richest men ...

2. ...even if one of them really uses Japanese characters, as are the world’s five richest men...

3. ...even if one of them really uses Japanese characters; as are the world’s five richest men...

Last edited by Robby zhu
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@Robby zhu posted:

The world’s three top central bankers (Greenspan, Duisenberg and Hayami) are all close to the top of the alphabet, even if one of them really uses Japanese characters. As are the world’s five richest men (Gates, Buffett, Allen, Ellison and Albrecht).

Hi, Robby zhu,

The original text looks fine to me.

@Robby zhu posted:

1. ...even if one of them really uses Japanese characters. So are the world’s five richest men ...

I think "as" is stylistically superior.

@Robby zhu posted:

2. ...even if one of them really uses Japanese characters, as are the world’s five richest men...

A comma would not work because the "even if"-clause is inserted in the middle, and the "as"-clause needs an immediate connection with the main clause.

@Robby zhu posted:

3. ...even if one of them really uses Japanese characters; as are the world’s five richest men...

A semicolon is not acceptable to introduce an afterthought. A period is.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@Robby zhu posted:

The world’s three top central bankers (Greenspan, Duisenberg and Hayami) are all close to the top of the alphabet, even if one of them really uses Japanese characters. As are the world’s five richest men (Gates, Buffett, Allen, Ellison and Albrecht).



. . . Is that full stop used correctly?

Hi, Robby zhu—Assuming you have quoted the example correctly (I can't see the actual article, only a bunch of Chinese language tests that ostensibly quote from it), I'd say the author deliberately chose to use a sentence fragment for the "as"-clause in order to show that "as" refers to the preceding independent clause rather than to the "even if"-clause, which comes right before it.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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