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Hello, everyone,
The distance I'm going to ask about:
1. He think I was lying, which is apparently not the case.

Do you think the relative clause is within the object clause:
He think [I was lying, which is apparently not the case.]
I don't think so, because the idea " which is apparently not the case" is not part of what he thought.

How do you parse the function of the relative clause then? Thanks.

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@Robby zhu posted:

Hello, everyone,
The distance I'm going to ask about:

Hello, Robby zhu—What do you mean by "distance"? Did you mean to write "sentence"? You seem to be asking about a sentence, not a distance.

@Robby zhu posted:


1. He think I was lying, which is apparently not the case.



The sentence is ungrammatical; "think" needs to be "thinks" (third-person singular present): "He thinks I was lying, which is apparently not the case."

@Robby zhu posted:

Do you think the relative clause is within the object clause:

He think [I was lying, which is apparently not the case.]
I don't think so, because the idea " which is apparently not the case" is not part of what he thought.

How do you parse the function of the relative clause then? Thanks.

It's a strange sentence in the absence of context, but the nonrestrictive relative appears to be commenting on the complement clause of "think": "which is apparently not the case" = "that I was lying is apparently not the case."

Last edited by David, Moderator

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