Do these two sentences have the same meaning:

1. Can you get my old car going again?

2. Can you get my old car started again?

Original Post

Hi, Toaha,

@Toaha posted:

Do these two sentences have the same meaning:

1. Can you get my old car going again?

2. Can you get my old car started again?

They are certainly similar. Speaking of a car, my impression is that "get it started" (or "get it to start") might refer to a one-off achievement, while "get it going" is more like "make it work" so it will keep running, not just this once but for some time. Do you agree, David?

They are certainly similar. Speaking of a car, my impression is that "get it started" (or "get it to start") might refer to a one-off achievement, while "get it going" is more like "make it work" so it will keep running, not just this once but for some time. Do you agree, David?

I do agree, Gustavo. Nice explanation. To me, "get the car started" refers specifically to the engine. If a car isn't starting, something is interfering with its ability to start, be it the battery, the alternator, or any number of things that I know nothing about. "Get the car going," by contrast, is much broader. A car that doesn't go is inoperable, but that needn't have to do with the engine. It could be that the tires are flat, the rear bumper is falling off, etc.

Wow! thanks for this awesome explanation David 💖 Could you please explain the meaning of "a one off achievement" that Gustavo mentioned in his comment.

Toaha, "one-off" means "happening only once." Therefore, if a mechanic, or a friend, helps you get your car started, that means the engine will start working. However, it might be the case that when you stop the car the battery fails again and you cannot restart it. Instead, "get the car going" sounds like the car will be restored to an operating condition on a more ongoing basis.

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