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Do the two sentences below have the same meaning and grammatical?

What is the difference between interest expense and interest expenses?

Example 1:

I have included additional interest expenses in the book. This gives rise to an increase of the trust losses, resulting in a reduction of the undistributed income to you in the 2020 income year.

Example 2:

I have included additional interest expenses in the book. This has resulted in an increase of the trust losses, which gives rise to a reduction of the undistributed income to you in the 2020 income year.

Original Post

Hi, Tony,

@Tony C posted:

Do the two sentences below have the same meaning and grammatical?

What is the difference between interest expense and interest expenses?

Example 1:

I have included additional interest expenses in the book. This gives rise to an increase of the trust losses, resulting in a reduction of the undistributed income to you in the 2020 income year.

Example 2:

I have included additional interest expenses in the book. This has resulted in an increase of the trust losses, which gives rise to a reduction of the undistributed income to you in the 2020 income year.

We always use "interest expenses" in the plural to refer to an accounting item (just like with other items such as assets, liabilities, etc.)

Both examples are correct but I prefer the use of the perfect perfect in (2). Also, the verb "result in" is more suitable to refer to a mathematical, and not just factual, consequence: the inclusion of these expenses has resulted in a larger total amount of losses. Instead of "which gives rise to," I'd write "in turn resulting in."

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