Hi, Khalid, and welcome to the G.E,

Khalid fawzy posted:

Alexandria is popular for or with its beautiful beaches.

I would go with: 'for'. The reason for Alex being popular is its beautiful beaches. 

A long time ago, I remember teaching a similar sentence to yours. It says:

- Alex is popular for holidays.

BTW, you can better say: Alex is famous for its beautiful beaches.

- What is Alex famous for? - It is famous for its beautiful beaches.

 

 

Khalid fawzy posted:

Alexandria is popular for or with its beautiful beaches.

Hi, Khalid fawzy, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

When you ask questions here, please actually ask a question. Since all the threads on this forum are about grammar, "Grammar" is not an appropriate title to give a discussion. Please use a title that is descriptive of the grammatical topic of the thread. Here you could use a title as simple as "for" or "with."

Lastly, when you wish to refer to words as words, please put them in quotation marks or italics. In your sentence, it appears that you are actually using the phrase "for or with its beautiful beaches" rather than asking if you should say "popular for its beautiful beaches" or "popular with its beautiful beaches."

I agree with Ahmed_btm that it is possible to say that this place is popular for its beautiful beaches. (I feel as though we've talked about this before!) We more commonly use "popular with" and "popular among," but those phrases give a different meaning. (They don't specify reason.) I recommend using "famous for":

  • Alexandria is famous for its beautiful beaches.

Ahmed_btm's example "Alex is popular for holidays" would not work if "popular" were changed to "famous." That is because "Alex is popular for holidays" is really an abbreviated idea, standing for "Alex is a popular place for people to go during their holidays."

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