"Happen to" or "happen with"

No.

Let's take two questions: "What happened to you?" and "What happened with you?"

"What happened TO you" means what affected you, what event had impact on you.

A: You're really late. And you're limping. What happened to you?
B: I fell on my way here and sprained my ankle. But, I wouldn't let that stop me from meeting you. I came anyway, late or not.

"What happened WITH you" means what's going on with you, what's up with you.

A: You were really ugly at the meeting today. What happened with you?
B: Ugly? I guess I'm just tired of having all the work dropped on me. One of these days, I'm just going to quit.

Another meaning of "what happened/ is happening/ has happened with" is "what's the story?"

A: What happened with Marlene? Is she going to help you or not?
B: I don't know. She never returned my phone calls.

A: What's happening with the weather these days? It's hot one day and cold the next.
B: I heard it's because of El Nino.

Sometime both "happen to" and "happen with" are possible:

A: What happened to/with our teacher? She left early today, and in such a hurry.
B: I don't know. She must have gotten some urgent message.

A: What's happened to/ with you? Don't you love me any more?
B: I don't know. I'm confused.

Rachel
Grammar Exchange wrote:

A: You've were really ugly at the meeting today. What happened with you?
B: Ugly? I guess I'm just tired of having all the work dropped on me. One of these days, I'm just going to quit.

I guess it was just a typo error. If not, the construction above is quite interesting, could you please explain more about it?

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