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The usual way to compare a two-syllable adjective ending in –y, like happy is to change the y to I and add –er.

If we use "more happy" instead of "happier," it means the same thing.

We might use "more happy" in a situation in which the word "happy" has already been mentioned, or is definitely known, as in these examples from the New York Times:

"¢ What you think you should do to be happy, like getting fitter and thinner, is part of a "cultural code" "” "an unscientific web of symbolic cultural fantasies" "” and once you realize this, you will perhaps feel a little more free to be a lot more happy.

"¢ ''I was more happy for her because she made the decision,'' Freeman said. ''I know her well enough to know she's a very proud athlete, and I respect her for what she represents.''

''She decided she wasn't ready to run and she didn't want to run,'' she added. ''The only important thing is that she's happy.'' (This is about Freeman's meaning that she is happy for herself, but even more happy for another person.)

Or, if two adjectives are being compared and the other one would take "more," "more" can also be used to compare "happy," (or another two-syllable adjective ending in –y):

"¢ But after arriving in Indiana with his wife, Alice (Mariel Hemingway), and daughter, Terri Jo (Melissa Ann Hackman), Bud gets a reminder that the Parks family is no more happy or stable than it has ever been.

Occasionally, someone just chooses to use "more happy" instead of "happier":

"¢ Sabine's critique is not trustworthy. In Byatt's collection of tales, the oral and the written traditions could not have a more happy marriage.

The usual way, of course, is to add –er to the two-syllable adjectives: happier, easier, busier, prettier, lazier, etc. It is possible to use "more" instead of –er, and, although not grammatically incorrect, it is not frequent. "More happy" might be used in the special cases, as in the first three examples above. The meanings of "happier" and "more happy" are the same.

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