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Hi,
I would like to ask if the following sentence is understandable:
"The effect has been studied heavily on A, but few on B"
The complete sentence should be
"The effect has been studied heavily on A, but the effect has been studied few on B"
I know that a clause should be after "but", but I just feel that it somehow makes sense.
Can people understand this even if it's grammatically error?

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@yan posted:

"The effect has been studied heavily on A, but few on B"
The complete sentence should be
"The effect has been studied heavily on A, but the effect has been studied few on B"
I know that a clause should be after "but", but I just feel that it somehow makes sense.

Hi, @yan,

The problem does not lie in eliding "the effect has been studied" in the second clause, but in the use of "few," which is ungrammatical there. "few" is a determiner, not an adverb, and cannot modify a verb but a noun.

Also, I think you want to refer to the effect on A and B, rather than to its having been studied on A and B (if the latter were the case, then I'd use "in" instead of "on").

Finally, I don't like the adverb "heavily" for "study" and prefer others like extensively, thoroughly, in depth.

Hi Gustavo,

Thanks for your reply.

For the original question. If I change "few" to "slightly", will it be correct?
"The effect has been studied heavily on A, but slightly on B"
Also, there is no subject and verb in the second clause. Could you tell me why is it correct or what kind of grammar is it?

What I want to say is same as the following: "I can find lots of research on A, but I can only find few research on B." (latter are not the case)
I shouldn't have changed the word. I'm sorry if this cause any inconvenience.

The reason why I use "heavily " is because I'm not sure if it's completed (There might be other research on A).
The thing I want to compare is the numbers of research on A and B.
In this case, the words you suggest seems to be a little different from what I want to say. 
Do you have any suggestion? Or the words are fine?

 
@yan posted:

For the original question. If I change "few" to "slightly", will it be correct?
"The effect has been studied heavily on A, but slightly on B" 

No, I'd use "scarcely", not "slightly." Did you read what I wrote about "heavily"?

@yan posted:

Also, there is no subject and verb in the second clause. Could you tell me why is it correct or what kind of grammar is it?

It's a case of ellipsis.

@yan posted:

What I want to say is same as the following: "I can find lots of research on A, but I can only find few research on B."

"few" is ungrammatical there too, because "research" is uncountable. You need "little."

@yan posted:

The reason why I use "heavily " is because I'm not sure if it's completed (There might be other research on A).
The thing I want to compare is the numbers of research on A and B.
In this case, the words you suggest seems to be a little different from what I want to say. 
Do you have any suggestion? Or the words are fine?

"heavily" has a negative connotation. "numbers of research" is also ungrammatical (you could say "amounts of research"). I suggest something like:

There has been a lot of research into the effects on A, but little into the effects on B.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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