How should I ask and answer?

I want to make tag questions and yes/no questions using the words "That + noun" to refer to a person who is diving and wearing a diving suit, so I don't know the sex. How should I ask and answer:

1 That person is a diver, aren't they?
- Yes, they are a diver.

2 That person is a diver, right?
- Yes, they are a diver.

3 That person is a diver, yeah?
- Yes, they are a diver.

4 That person is a diver, don't you think?
- Yes, they are a diver. 

5 That person is a diver, wouldn't you say?
- Yes, they are a diver.

6. Is that person a diver?
- Yes, they are a diver.

Thank you for your help!

Original Post

Kimconu, welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

I'm interested to know something, though.  If you see someone diving while wearing a diving suit, what would prompt you to ask whether that person is a diver?  If you saw someone play a beautiful piano sonata, would you ask if that person were a musician?

And why make tag questions if you don't absolutely have to?  If you're really confused about whether the person in question is truly a diver, stay with (6).  Leave it to the other person to decide how to answer.  If he's smart, he'll leave it at "yes".

DocV

Kimconu posted:

I want to make tag questions and yes/no questions using the words "That + noun" to refer to a person who is diving and wearing a diving suit, so I don't know the sex.

Hello, Kimconu, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

There is one little point I'd like to add to DocV's answer above, with which I agree. It is that there is usually nothing wrong with guessing the sex of the person whom you are referring to. I do this all the time on this forum.

I have no idea whether you are male or female, but if I were writing a sentence in which a singular third-person pronoun referring to you were called for, I'd simply choose. If I guessed wrong, and it mattered to you, you'd correct me.

Thus, if you want to use normal tag questions in your scenario, consider these:

7. That person is a diver, isn't he?
- Yes, he is.

8. That person is a diver, isn't he?
- Yes, she is.

9. That person is a diver, isn't she?
- Yes, she is.

10. That person is a diver, isn't she?
- Yes, he is.

In (8) and (10), the first speaker guesses the gender of the diver incorrectly, and the second speaker corrects him in the reply. This presupposes that the second speaker knows. If he doesn't, they can both go wrong together.

Why did I assume that both speakers were male? I did so because I felt like it.

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