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Hi,

 I want to know if they mean exactly same. 

You've already arrived.  You've arrived already.

I looked up some dictionaries and I found:

When "already" is at the end of a sentence,  it expresses surprise.

Is it always true? Or they are just same to be in the middle of the sentence and at the end of the sentence?

 

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Hi, Alexandra,

@alexandra posted:

Hi,

 I want to know if they mean exactly same. 

You've already arrived.  You've arrived already.

I looked up some dictionaries and I found:

When "already" is at the end of a sentence,  it expresses surprise.

Is it always true? Or they are just same to be in the middle of the sentence and at the end of the sentence?

 

It is a matter of style. 'Already' is normally found in mid-position as it is more formal. In informal speaking, it is used at the end of a sentence for greater emphasis or to show greater surprise. See:

https://dictionary.cambridge.o...tish-grammar/already

                       &

https://thegrammarexchange.inf.../topic/using-already

Hi, Alexandra—Ahmed has provided you with some good information already. I'd just like to point out that, as in the sentence I just finished writing, placing "already" at the end of a sentence often simply emphasizes that something has already occurred. It doesn't express surprise in such sentences.

In my native-speaking experience, when "already" expresses surprise in sentence-final position, it is generally used with rising intonation to form a question out of a declarative sentence, i.e., a sentence in which subject-auxiliary inversion is not present. This is common in informal spoken English only.

A: When is John going to get here?
B: He's already arrived.
A: He's arrived already?
B: Yes. He's been here for the last twenty minutes.
A: Wow. Thanks for letting me know.

Hi, Alexandra—Ahmed has provided you with some good information already. I'd just like to point out that, as in the sentence I just finished writing, placing "already" at the end of a sentence often simply emphasizes that something has already occurred. It doesn't express surprise in such sentences.

In my native-speaking experience, when "already" expresses surprise in sentence-final position, it is generally used with rising intonation to form a question out of a declarative sentence, i.e., a sentence in which subject-auxiliary inversion is not present. This is common in informal spoken English only.

A: When is John going to get here?
B: He's already arrived.
A: He's arrived already?
B: Yes. He's been here for the last twenty minutes.
A: Wow. Thanks for letting me know.

It really helps me a lot!Now I can understand completely!Thank you very much!

@ahmed_btm posted:

Hi, Alexandra,

It is a matter of style. 'Already' is normally found in mid-position as it is more formal. In informal speaking, it is used at the end of a sentence for greater emphasis or to show greater surprise. See:

https://dictionary.cambridge.o...tish-grammar/already

                       &

https://thegrammarexchange.inf.../topic/using-already

Get it!Thank you very much!

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