how to use the word "scold"

A native English speaker wrote in her book that the word "scold" is old-fashioned and not used in a situation, for example, where a child has caused some trouble at school and his teacher yelled at him." According to the writer, the child would say, "I got in trouble at school today" rather than "I was scolded at school today."

If this is correct, why do we often see newspaper articles in which the word "scold" is used as in the following excerpts. Is there any difference in meaning or nuance in the usage of the word?

・Trump scolded the media ...

・Tom Price resigned ... after being publicly scolded by Mr. Trump...

 

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Hi, Fujibei: Welcome to the new platform! It's nice to see you again. Please review our policy on the use of quotations and source material. You have referred to an author's views in a book without telling us which author or which book you are talking about, and you have used two article quotations without using quotation punctuation or telling us which articles they are from. Please take this as constructive criticism. My intention is not to scold you.

fujibei posted:
Is there any difference in meaning or nuance in the usage of the word?

・Trump scolded the media ...

・Tom Price resigned ... after being publicly scolded by Mr. Trump...

I agree with the author that "scold" is a bit old-fashioned. The image that comes to mind for me with "scolding" is "finger-wagging," that is, a person wagging his or her finger at someone while chiding that person for something they've done. That is not generally what comes to mind when one thinks of a student's getting in trouble at school in today's world.

scolding

But it is what comes to mind when one thinks of Trump. Here is part of the O.E.D.'s definition of "scold":

"To use undignifed vehemence or persistence in reproof or fault-finding; colloq. often merely, to utter continuous reproof."

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