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Hi, Toaha,

@Toaha posted:

What are the difference in meaning between them?


1. I want him arrested.

2. I want him to get arrested.

3. I want him being arrested.

Of all your three sentences, I prefer the first one. The second one works, but needs more context and I think it seems better with 'be'. It is more natural to hear it in the negative. The third one is ungrammatical. 

@Toaha posted:

What are the difference in meaning between them?
1. I want him arrested.
2. I want him to get arrested.
3. I want him being arrested.

Hi, Toaha—"I want him arrested" is most naturally interpreted as meaning the same thing as "I want him to be arrested," though at least one other interpretation (which need not be gone into) is possible.

"I want him to get arrested" can mean the same thing as "I want him (to be) arrested"; however, with the "get" passive, there is a slight sense that it will be his fault. Compare: "I want him to get himself arrested."

"I want him being arrested," while not necessarily ungrammatical, is not a sentence that I could imagine a nonnative English learner ever having a need to use. A movie director could, I suppose, use the sentence as a "stage direction."

Last edited by David, Moderator

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