ruifeng posted:

You can learn about China (     ) books.

A. in   B. from

I think both work here.

Hi, Ruifeng: I share DocV's preference ("from"), but you are right that both work. The reason "from" works so well is that it gives the sense that the books act as teachers. Compare:

  • You can learn about China from Ruifeng.

That sense implies that the addressee can be taught things about China by you. That is how he will learn about China. With "in," the sentence could be used in answer to the question "Where can I learn about China?" Compare:

  • You can learn about China in films and books.

It would be strange to say, ? "You can learn about China in films and from books," as that combines the teacher meaning with the place meaning. If we included the Internet, however, we would need a preposition other than "in":

  • You can learn about China in films, in books, and on the Internet.

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