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a. He dated two women in New York and Los Angeles.
b. He dated two women, in New York and Los Angeles.

c. He dated two women in New York and in Los Angeles.
d. He dated two women, in New York and in Los Angeles.


What do the above sentences mean?

Which of the following meanings could they have?

1. He dated one woman in New York and one in Los Angeles.
2. He dated the same two woman in the two cities.
3. He dated four women in all. Two in NY and two in LA.

It seems to me that the commas make it clear that he dated two women in all. Not sure though.

Many thanks

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@azz posted:

a. He dated two women in New York and Los Angeles.
b. He dated two women, in New York and Los Angeles.

c. He dated two women in New York and in Los Angeles.
d. He dated two women, in New York and in Los Angeles.


What do the above sentences mean?

Which of the following meanings could they have?

1. He dated one woman in New York and one in Los Angeles.
2. He dated the same two woman in the two cities.
3. He dated four women in all. Two in NY and two in LA.

It seems to me that the commas make it clear that he dated two women in all. Not sure though.

Hi, Azz—All four of your examples are very ambiguous, each of them admitting at least the three interpretations you have given. If you want the sentence to mean that he dated a woman in New York and another woman in Los Angeles, you should change the phrasing:

e. He dated two women, one in New York and another in Los Angeles.

Please note, however, that that sentence does not tell us whether he was maintaining two separate relationships in different locations or whether he had one relationship at one time in one of the locations and another relationship at another time in the other location.

Thank you so much David!

One question that arises is whether he was 'two-timing' or not. I think if he dated four women in all, then in (b) and (d) the implication would be that he was... Not sure...



Consider:

He has dated two women, in New York and Los Angeles.

If we assume that means he dated two women in NY and two in LA, wouldn't we conclude that he was two-timing?



Many thanks,

@azz posted:


Consider:

He has dated two women, in New York and Los Angeles.

If we assume that means he dated two women in NY and two in LA, wouldn't we conclude that he was two-timing?

Hello again, Azz—To me, the sentence "He has dated two women, in New York and Los Angeles" is compatible with (i) his two-timing in both places, (i) his one-timing in sequence in both places, or (iii) his four-timing, or dating both women simultaneously in both locations.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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