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Hi, Mohamed Emara,

Can we say,"American English is more different than Britain English."?



'Different' can be followed by the prepositions 'from', 'to' and 'than'. There could be a problem with your example because of the usage of 'than'.  Your example can be read like this:

- American English is more different (from, to, than) British English than Canadian English.



Can the adjective, "different" be used in comparison like any other adjective? Can we say," more different / the most different / as different as" or it is an absolute adjective?



Yes, it can. I think you know the phrase "as different as chalk and cheese". Also, See 'more different from' on this link:

https://www.merriam-webster.co...om-or-different-than

Finally, you can find many examples using 'the most different' on Coca.

BTW, please, notice that the title of this thread should be changed because 'inquiry' tells nothing about the content of this thread. 

Last edited by ahmed_btm

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